The Risks of Older Wiring in Homes

Written by Christopher Beard

An expert electrical engineer or electrician can make findings and opinions are based on a review of a home and documents and invoices from various persons who performed electrical work a home, as well as parts of various editions of the local Building Code, including older editions of the National Electrical Code.  Here are some example of older wiring problems that can give rise to liability.

Was it required for the removal of old, outdated, and dangerous wiring, including the wiring in the room?

If there is knob and tube  is should be marked. The markings on the knob-and-tube wiring must distinguish the 120-volt wire and the neutral wire due to the outer cable being worn out. National Electrical Code Article 210.5(c) requires that all wiring must be distinguished by color-coding.

Also the knob-and-tube wiring is breaking down due to expanding. When a residence is divided from single-use to multi-use, in this house from one to six electrical services, the contractors must physically touch knob-and-tube wiring throughout the building so that circuits can be split up to the correct panels and the different service locations can be metered and billed correctly.

Is the insulation is breaking down and bare copper wire is nearly visible?

Vinyl tape does not have a long working life and starts to become brittle and lose strength.

An accident in an older multi-use dwelling could also been avoided if the owner or contractor had replaced the knob­ and-tube wiring and the fuse panel in the house when the other  modern  electrical panels were installed that splits the dwelling into separate metered apartments.

 

If you need an electric shock attorney, or electrocution lawyer, contact Christopher L. Beard for a consultation.

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